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December 2016

We’re Crazy for Cara Cara’s – Winters Favorite Orange

 "intuitive forager" "farmers markets" "downtown summerlin" "las vegas” “farm to table” “fresh produce” “support small farms” “support local” “farmers market” “organic” “non gmo” “how to cook” “health benefits” “cooking with” "cara cara oranges" "oranges"

Cara Cara Oranges (AKA the Pink Navel)

Don’t be fooled by the Cara Cara’s average appearance. From the outside they look like your typical navel orange, but inside they contain a flesh worthy of mouth-watering and blissful sentiments. Their tender, succulent, and juicy flesh is more of a dark salmon or pink color, similar to that of a ruby grapefruit, and has a rich sweet flavor reminiscent of Tangerines with layered Citrus notes.

Easy to peel, Cara Cara’s are also seedless, making them a perfect candidate for eating fresh out of hand. Their nearly perfect balance of sweetness and acidity also makes them an excellent choice for a whole host of culinary applications, including jams, sauces, vinaigrettes, baking, juices, syrups, curds, and as a fresh ingredient in winter salads, along with salsas, chutneys and sauces (especially when paired with fish or poultry). And finally – don’t toss that peel – at least not until you zest it! The zest of Cara Cara’s is particularly aromatic with layered citrus notes and hints of florals.

Nutrition: So not only are Cara Cara’s delicious, but they are a perfect “power orange” with an extra level of immunity boosters to help you battle off those winter colds. The red and pink tones of the Cara Cara’s flesh is due to the pigment Lycopene – a powerful disease fighting antioxidant. In addition they are an excellent source of Vitamin’s C, A, Fiber, Potassium, and folate.

 "intuitive forager" "farmers markets" "downtown summerlin" "las vegas” “farm to table” “fresh produce” “support small farms” “support local” “farmers market” “organic” “non gmo” “how to cook” “health benefits” “cooking with” "cara cara oranges" "citrus" "oranges"Here are some of our favorite recipes on the web perfect for making the most of your Cara Caras:
(Clockwise from Upper Left)

Cara Cara’s with Rosemary and Honey:
http://cookingontheweekends.com/2016/02/rosemary-honey-marinated-oranges-recipe/

Orange, Avocado, and Beet Salad:
http://www.marthastewart.com/1050475/avocado-beet-and-orange-salad

Cara Cara Orange Punch:
http://www.marthastewart.com/312865/sparkling-cider-and-cara-cara-orange-pun

Orange, Honey, and Rosemary Pork Chops:
http://www.marthastewart.com/972712/orange-honey-and-rosemary-glazed-pork-chops

Tokyo Turnips

 

 "intuitive forager" "farmers markets" "downtown summerlin" "las vegas” “farm to table” “fresh produce” “support small farms” “support local” “farmers market” “organic” “non gmo” “how to cook” “health benefits” “cooking with” "turnips" "tokyo turnips" "japanese turnips"

Tokyo Turnips (Japanese Turnips)

White and round with a tiny little tendril/tail at the bottom, Tokyo (aka Japanese) Turnips are smaller in size than other varietals, more resembling radishes. Tender and crisp they have a sweet and mildly fruity and peppery flavor. They also feature long green leafy stems which are entirely edible (tasting similar to mustard greens).

Unlike other Turnip varieties, the Tokyo Turnip can be eaten raw, and is even preferred that way by some. The skin does not require peeling, only a quick scrub under water, and then slice or dice for fresh eating, or toss into a salad (where you can pair them with their own greens). However they can also be sliced and sautéed, roasted, or boiled and added to soups and stews, as well pickled. Cooking them enhances their sweetness and also brings forth a nutty nuance to their flavor (and reduces any bitterness or bite).

Culinary Note: While Turnips are generally considered sweet every once in a while they can taste unaccountably bitter to certain people, this is due to cyanoglucosides, a chemical they contain which – dependent on a person’s genetics – may make them overly sensitive to it.

Nutrition: Tokyo Turnips are a good source of Vitamin C as well as Fiber, however their greens contain even more nutritional value with high levels of Vitamins A, B, C, & K as well as Folate, Calcium, and Manganese. So even if you are choosing to use your Turnips themselves in a cooked preparation, save those greens and toss them into a salad or light stir-fry.

 "intuitive forager" "farmers markets" "downtown summerlin" "las vegas” “farm to table” “fresh produce” “support small farms” “support local” “farmers market” “organic” “non gmo” “how to cook” “health benefits” “cooking with” "turnips" "tokyo turnips" "japanese turnips"Here are some of our favorite recipes on the web perfect for making the most of your Tokyo Turnips (and their Greens):
(Clockwise from Upper Left)

Glazed Japanese Turnips:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/glazed-hakurei-turnips-368274

Tokyo Turnips with Greens:
http://www.marthastewart.com/313959/tokyo-turnips

Sweet and Sour Pan-Roasted Turnips:
http://www.thekitchn.com/find-sweet-love-with-baby-turnips-220991

Sauteed Japanese Turnips with Turnip Greens:
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/06/japanese-turnips-saute-easy-side-dish-recipe.html

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We Dig the Bite – Black Radishes are here!

 "intuitive forager" "farmers markets" "downtown summerlin" "las vegas” “farm to table” “fresh produce” “support small farms” “support local” “farmers market” “organic” “non gmo” “how to cook” “health benefits” “cooking with” "radishes" "black radishes" "spanish radishes"

Black Radishes (Spanish Radishes)

As the name suggests Black Radishes have a black or dark brown skin, and are much larger than your traditional Spring Radishes. Their white interior flesh is crisp with a slightly bitter and spicy radish flavor. The dark skin’s flavoring is particularly strong – if you prefer a more mild radish taste, try peeling the skin before eating.

Similar to the Tokyo Turnip above, the Black Radish can be eaten raw or cooked, and is suitable to a variety of culinary preparations. They go great diced and added to soups or stir-fry’s, where they can add that perfect bite of heat. You can also sauté and braise them, or roast them and smother in butter for a delicious vegetable side dish. To reduce the heat of your Black Radishes peel them (as mentioned above) – in addition you can also salt and rinse them prior to cooking with them.

Nutrition: Black Radishes have long been used in Ancient, Folk and Chinese Medicines – for everything from Gallbladder and Pulmonary to Respiratory and Liver health. They are an excellent source of Vitamin C, Iron, Magnesium, and Potassium, as well as providing Vitamins A, B, and E. Black Radishes are also often a main ingredient of juices/tonics used to aid in digestive disorders, as they help affect bile and bloating.

 "intuitive forager" "farmers markets" "downtown summerlin" "las vegas” “farm to table” “fresh produce” “support small farms” “support local” “farmers market” “organic” “non gmo” “how to cook” “health benefits” “cooking with” "black radishes" "radish dishes" "spanish radishes"

Black Radishes seem to get a bad rap when it comes to their use in the Kitchen, so we wanted to provide you with a variety of ways to highlight these specialty radishes:
(Clockwise from upper left):

Black Radish Relish:
http://www.wellpreserved.ca/black-radish-relish-recipe/

Roasted Black and Red Radishes:
http://www.platedwithstyle.com/2013/06/07/farm-share-friday-roasted-black-and-red-radishes/

Black Radish Soup:
http://www.sowfreshorganics.com/recipes/sweet-potato-and-black-radish-soup/

Roasted Black Radish and Grape Quinoa:
http://brooklynsupper.com/2013/04/roasted-black-radish-and-grape-quinoa/

And in addition – try out making your own “Black Radish Chips”:
http://chocolateandzucchini.com/recipes/vegetables-grains/black-radish-chips-recipe/

Now In – Puntarella!

"intuitive forager" "farmers markets" "downtown summerlin" "las vegas” “farm to table” “fresh produce” “support small farms” “support local” “farmers market” “organic” “non gmo” “how to cook” “health benefits” “cooking with” "puntarella" "puntarelle"

Puntarella (Puntarelle)

Known for its crispy texture and peppered distinct chicory flavoring, this chicory variety features light green hallow shoots leading from its white base and out to its elongated serrated greens. Most commonly used in Italy, the leafy greens are often served raw in a rich dressing of anchovies, olive oil, garlic and lemon juice or white wine vinegar. The shoots (with flavor undertones reminiscent of Fennel with a textural crunch of Celery) are usually julienned into thin strips and soaked in ice cold water – and once they have curled slightly (and the bitterness has reduced) are used in complimentary pairings with feta, olives, bacon, caviar, cream based dressings, forest mushrooms, gorgonzola or ripening cheeses, green onions, basil and mint.

Thanks to its aromatic quality, Puntarella stimulates bile and aids in digestion, and is also full of fiber and mineral salts (calcium, iron, and phosphorus), precious elements that remain unaltered when eaten raw.

"intuitive forager" "farmers markets" "downtown summerlin" "las vegas” “farm to table” “fresh produce” “support small farms” “support local” “farmers market” “organic” “non gmo” “how to cook” “health benefits” “cooking with” "recipes" "puntarella" "puntarelle"Here are some of our favorite recipes on the web featuring Puntarella:
(Clockwise from upper left)

Puntarella in Anchovy Sauce:
http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Chicory-in-Anchovy-Sauce-Puntarelle-in-Salsa-di-Alici

Puntarella and Blood Orange Salad:
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/recipes/blood-orange-and-puntarelle-salad-1916309.html

Puntarelle Salad:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/insalata-di-puntarelle-232084

Puntarelle and Tiny Potato Salad:
http://herbivoracious.com/2009/09/puntarelle-and-tiny-potato-salad-recipe.html

Tis the Season for Citrus!

"intuitive forager" "farmers markets" "downtown summerlin" "las vegas” “farm to table” “fresh produce” “support small farms” “support local” “farmers market” “organic” “non gmo” "citrus" "oro blanco" "grapefruit" "cara cara" "oranges" "kishu" "tangerines" "mandarines" "yuzu lemons"Here’s a sneak peek at some our just-in “First of the Season” Citrus arriving in at the Markets now (clockwise from upper left):

Oro Blanco Grapefruit – this seedless cross between a pomelo and grapefruit is the perfect citrus for that family member with a sweet tooth! Slightly less acidic and bitter than the traditional grapefruit, this varietal tastes like a fresh bouquet of flowers.

Cara Cara Oranges – don’t be fooled by this navel oranges average exterior – compared to traditional navels, the seedless Cara Cara is sweeter (with a slight tang) and less acidic, with a hint of red fruit, like cranberry.

Yuzu Lemons – from Alan Parson’s citrus lined ranch in Montecito comes this famously aromatic Japanese fruit! It’s strong sour-tart flavor makes it the ideal souring ingredient through either its juice or zest – plus its one of the few citrus fruits that can maintain its tartness at high cooking temperatures.

Kishu Tangerines – this seedless variety may be small but it packs a delicious, juicy, and sweet punch. These tender treats are easy to peel and making them the ultimate “stocking stuffer” citrus – a go-to for kids especially…who may just eat these before they dig into their candy.

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